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Scotland has been synonymous with whisky for 500 years, but whisky tasting is a newer phenomenon. In recent decades, it has grown into a major attraction. This means that a number of world-renowned distilleries have opened their facilities for tours. It also means that Tours Scotlandoffers a delectable menu of whisky tasting in Edinburgh and other locales.
 
Whisky Tours

Whether you are a whisky drinker with a seasoned palate or you are hoping to develop a taste for Scotland’s most famous beverage, Tours Scotland can help you. Here are some tips to help you get started so that you will be able to better anticipate your whisky tasting adventure.
 
Whisky is an experience for all the senses. It is also a personal enterprise. As you look at the whisky in your glass and deeply inhale its scent, you may recall certain memories. Recollections of a sweet smelling meadow on a sunny day or the burnished mahogany of an antique desk might flash through your mind, enhancing and personalizing your experience.
 
Notice the glass that the whisky is served in. It has a unique tulip shape, which you may not be accustomed. This is known as a nosing glass. It allows you to fully appreciate the unforgettable aroma of the whisky you are about to enjoy. However, before you breathe it in, take a moment to visually study the whisky. The colour of the liquid reveals a great deal about how old it is and what kind of cask it was stored in. Darker colours indicate an older whisky while something lighter may mean a younger single malt.
 
Swirl the liquid so that it coats the sides of the glass, watching as legs form and begin moving back to the bottom of the glass. Once again, this can reveal more about the age and personality of the whisky. Full bodied distillations have heavier legs while a lighter concoction has a greater number of slender legs.
 
Raise the glass to your nose. With your mouth slightly open take several short, sharp inhalations. Spend a moment identifying what you smell. It may remind you of a favorite meal, a spring bloom or any number of other things.
 
Take a sip, moving it around your mouth and over your tongue. Identifying which scents are reflected in the flavour is part of the fun. You might also try adding a dash of water, which is said to reveal underlying characteristics in the whisky.

Whisky Tasting